In the Media 

24th July 08 - GTV9 television coverage - A Current Affair

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24th August 08 - Radio 2UE Sydney Interview - http://www.lowtonoadditives.com/2ue.mp3

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Viewbank author Bridy Fulvio and her children Lochie, 3, and Tommy, nine months, try some of the additive-free food. 

Seeing minuses in additives

Tim Vainoras

19Feb08

Viewbank author Bridy Fulvio and her children Lochie, 3, and Tommy, nine months, try some of the additive-free food.

Viewbank author Bridy Fulvio and her children Lochie, 3, and Tommy, nine months, try some of the additive-free food.

 

VIEWBANK'S Bridy Fulvio was alarmed to find some everyday foods had dangerous additives that affected her children's health and behaviour.

Now she has teamed up with best friend and mother-of-two Olivia Dyer to warn parents on how to avoid nasty additives and still cook up a delicious meal.

The pair co-wrote a cookbook of recipes, Low to No Additives  Family Favourites, which will be launched at Volumes Bookstore, Eltham,  at 10am on Saturday, February 23.

``While many additives pass the guidelines to be used in Australia, often they are not tested in combination with other additives,'' Ms Fulvio said.

``Unfortunately, the result of this leaves our children as the guinea pigs.''

Studies reveal links between additives in food on supermarket shelves and behavioural disorders, allergies, asthma, and gastric problems. Additives have also been linked to cancer and DNA changes in rats.

From observations with her own children, Tommy, nine months, and Lochie, 3, Ms Fulvio is certain a ``definite correlation'' exists between food additives and behavioural problems and allergies.

Ms Fulvio said Lochie's allergies started with a reaction to sulphite in milk when he stopped breathing. Lochie also suffered hypersensitivity after consuming additive 211 found in soft drinks.

``The last time (he had 211) he climbed the curtains in our house,'' she said.
 
Once additives were removed, both his behaviour improved and even his eczema disappeared.

Co-author Olivia Dyer's son, Noah, was suspected to have autism spectrum disorder until she cut out additives and saw a significant improvement.

Ms Fulvio said a resource was needed to help families eradicate additives from their diets with manufacturers using ``clever consumer  tricking'' and food labelling loopholes.

Books are available at www.lowtonoadditives.com or at book stockists in Eltham, Rosanna, Greensborough, Lower Plenty and Heidelberg.

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LowToNoAdditives has appeared in The Shepparton Adviser, Benalla Ensign and Border Mail



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